Sonya and Travis http://sonyaandtravis.com tales of travel and adventure Thu, 05 Dec 2013 09:23:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8 Angkor Wat, Cambodia – the largest religious monument in the world http://sonyaandtravis.com/angkor-wat-cambodia-largest-religious-monument-world/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=angkor-wat-cambodia-largest-religious-monument-world http://sonyaandtravis.com/angkor-wat-cambodia-largest-religious-monument-world/#comments Wed, 04 Dec 2013 01:28:12 +0000 http://sonyaandtravis.com/?p=2675 We arrived in Siem Reap late in the evening, and had an early night ready for a day of exploring the Angkor Wat temples. We stayed at the lovely Angkor Secret Garden Hotel, where we also hired bikes for $2 … Continue reading

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We arrived in Siem Reap late in the evening, and had an early night ready for a day of exploring the Angkor Wat temples. We stayed at the lovely Angkor Secret Garden Hotel, where we also hired bikes for $2 a day. Angkor Wat is roughly 7km North of Siem Reap and took us about forty minutes to cycle there one way. At the entrance, we purchased a three-day ticket and headed towards the beautiful Angkor Wat, which was met first once inside the complex.

It was unexpected how large the complex was, particularly the outer surrounding moat, it was also unexpected how many people were there. We wandered to the north-side of the temple, trying to keep away from the tourists entering from the central main entrance. We explored the north flanking library and walked past the water lily filled Reflecting Pond towards the entrance.

We entered the temple’s first level, which present us with a cruciform shaped cloister, known as the ‘Hall of a Thousand Gods’.  We explored the inner libraries which were surrounded by lush green grass. We climbed higher into the second level, which featured stone window pillars surrounding the inner gallery called the Bakan. These stone pillars, look like they have been carved on a lathe, and are supposed to mimic wood, which I totally agreed they did.

There was a long queue snaking around the edge of the Bakan for entrance to the inner gallery, after a little under an hour, we reached the eastern stairs. We climbed the steep sloped stairs, which  represent the ‘difficulty of ascending to the kingdom of the gods’. At the top were beautiful views of the jungle that surrounded Angkor Wat’s perimeter, right in the centre was the Angkor Wat central spire.

Back on the first level we navigated the outer perimeter of the inner bas-relief friezes, highlights included Heaven and Hell, Battle of the Gods, Procession of Suryavarman II and of course Churning of the Sea of Milk.

We left Angkor Wat, though not the last visit, on our bikes towards Angkor Thom.

Far north-western outer-wall entranceView of the outer-wall from insideView of the northern library with Angkor Wat temple in the background
Pond full of magenta water lilies adjacent Angkor WatMagenta water lilies in bloomPond of water lilies at Angkor Wat
Cruciform terrace guarded by lions connecting the causeway to the central structureIntricate stone carved windows mimicking the look of woodCylindrical stone carving imitating turned wood on a lathe
One of the Buddha status inside the cruciform cloister called Preah Poan, Hall of a Thousand GodsInside the cruciform cloister called Preah Poan, Hall of a Thousand GodsTravis at the southern entry of the cruciform cloister
View of the second gallery from the southern libraryCylindrical stone carvings at the window openingsSonya at the southern library with view of the inner area
View of the second gallery's outer wallStone totems in front of the second gallery's out wallDevatas on the wall of inside the second gallery
Sonya reading the guide at the base of the steps to the inner galleryInner gallery with central shrine and four surrounding gopuraMonkey and Garuda costumes
The very steep stairways represent the difficulty of ascending to the kingdom of the godsNorthern view of the jungle from Angkor WatOne of the Buddha status inside the inner gallery
The central Angkor Wat spireStanding Buddha status inside the main inner spireDeep devata wall carving
Looking west, towards Angkor balloonThe battle of KurukshetraDeep carved bas-reliefs
The army of King Suryavarman IIThe army of King Suryavarman IIHeaven and Hell, the Hell
The Churning of the Sea of MilkAngkor Wat temple seen from the main entranceSerpent and lion at the main entrance

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Fried tarantula – a local delicacy, Skuon, Cambodia http://sonyaandtravis.com/fried-tarantula-a-delicacy-skuon-cambodia/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=fried-tarantula-a-delicacy-skuon-cambodia http://sonyaandtravis.com/fried-tarantula-a-delicacy-skuon-cambodia/#comments Sun, 06 Oct 2013 02:12:01 +0000 http://sonyaandtravis.com/?p=2660 A little out of Phnom Penh on the way to Siem Reap is the small rest-stop city of Skuon. There is a particular snack that Skuon is famous for, deep fried tarantula, which gives the city its nickname of Spiderville. … Continue reading

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A little out of Phnom Penh on the way to Siem Reap is the small rest-stop city of Skuon. There is a particular snack that Skuon is famous for, deep fried tarantula, which gives the city its nickname of Spiderville. Piled up on a plate between some kind of fried beetle and what I think is quail, was deep fried tarantula. Naturally, I purchased one and stored it in my backpack to try when I got back to the hotel. Sonya was not impressed.

It did take a lot of courage to eat it, even though it was clearly dead, my  body seemed to naturally resist eating it. The legs and body was quite crunchy, the flavour masked by the chilli spice-mix. The abdomen was slightly soft and more difficult to swallow, not helped by the idea of eating the spider’s insides.

Pile of fried tarantulas
Fried tarantula ready to eat
Travis eating tried tarantula, yummy

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Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum, Phnom Penh, Cambodia http://sonyaandtravis.com/tuol-sleng-genocide-museum-phnom-penh-cambodia/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=tuol-sleng-genocide-museum-phnom-penh-cambodia http://sonyaandtravis.com/tuol-sleng-genocide-museum-phnom-penh-cambodia/#comments Mon, 18 Feb 2013 00:21:08 +0000 http://sonyaandtravis.com/?p=2640 Prior to our bus ride to Siem Reap, we decided to visit one of the sorrowing relics from Cambodia’s painful history. The Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum, formally a high-school, was converted to infamous Security Prison 21 during the Khmer Rouge … Continue reading

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Prior to our bus ride to Siem Reap, we decided to visit one of the sorrowing relics from Cambodia’s painful history. The Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum, formally a high-school, was converted to infamous Security Prison 21 during the Khmer Rouge rule.

The compound was disheartening and eerie, barred window rooms barely touched since their use, a single bed with iron shackles used to constrain the prisoners. Some rooms still had blood stained floors with even footprints visible.

Building B was quite emotional, a photo collage of the hundreds of men and women who were sent to Security Prison 21. Pol Pot was very detailed with documentation , for all prisoners who arrived at the prison, photos were taken of them. Some of the people were even photographed smiling, unaware of the horrors that they would be witness to.

Out of buildings B, C and D, building C was the only one left untouched to preserve the initial prison design. Barbed wire remains around the ground floor, stopped anyone from trying to escape,  the large rooms were converted into tiny cells, less than a metre squared. The upper levels were the same, though this time separated by wood, a decision probably made due to the floor height already making it difficult to escape.

The last builder, D, was the most chilling, with sections of instrumentation used for torturing the prisoners. Two water torture apparatus can be seen, one used for water-boarding, and the other for water submersion. One of the final rooms housed a number of skulls of the victims.

Entrance to the Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum
One of the large cells in Building A, Security Prison 21
One of the large cells in Building A notice the shackles on the bed
Building B seen from Building A
Bloody footprints still seen in the rooms
Hard beds in the rooms of Building A
Original iron shackles lying on the bed
Security Prison 21 - Security of Regulation
Original school play equipment converted into instruments of torture
Portraits of the many people sent to Security Prison 21
Hundreds of shackles all used to constrain the prisoners
The exterior walkways of Building B inside Security Prison 21
Preserved Building C with barbed-wire around the ground floor
Barbed-wire fence and entrance to Building C at Security Prison 21
The lower floor of Building C, converted into small cells
View through the barbed-wire of Building C towards Security Prison 21 grounds
Upper floors of Building C, rooms converted into wooden small cells
Sonya at the walkway of Building C
One of the rooms with a genocide display
Barbed-wire fence outside Building C of Security Prison 21
Room of instruments of torture, a water boarding device can be seen
Bone fragments and skulls from those murdered in Security Prison 21
A map made from the skulls of victims in Security Prison 21
The original high-school grounds converted to Security Prison 21

At the entrance was a list of “The Security of Regulation”

  1. You must answer accordingly to my questions – don’t turn them away.
  2. Don’t try to hide the facts by making pretexts this and that – you are strictly prohibited to contest me.
  3. Don’t be fool for you are a chap who dare to thwart the revolution.
  4. You must immediately answer my questions without wasting time to reflect.
  5. Don’t’ tell me either about your immoralities or the essence of the revolution.
  6. While getting lashes or electrification you must not cry at all.
  7. Do nothing, sit still and wait for my orders, if there is not order, keep quiet, when I ask you to do something, you must do it right away without protesting.
  8. Don’t make pretext about Kampuchea Kromin order to hide your secret or traitor
  9. If you don’t follow all the above rules, you shall get many lashes of electric wire.
  10. If you disobey any point of my regulations you shall get either ten lashes or five shows of electric discharge.

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Phnom Penh Night Market, Cambodia http://sonyaandtravis.com/phnom-penh-night-market-cambodia/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=phnom-penh-night-market-cambodia http://sonyaandtravis.com/phnom-penh-night-market-cambodia/#comments Sat, 26 Jan 2013 10:06:44 +0000 http://sonyaandtravis.com/?p=2632 We arrived in Phnom Penh after a two hour flight from Singapore. We caught a tuk-tuk from the airport to downtown where we would be staying. Upon our arrival at the hotel, the staff advised that while we had made … Continue reading

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We arrived in Phnom Penh after a two hour flight from Singapore. We caught a tuk-tuk from the airport to downtown where we would be staying. Upon our arrival at the hotel, the staff advised that while we had made a room reservation, they did not have a room available and sent us to a sister hotel a few blocks away, a bit further from the main tourist area. We were quite annoyed  and frustrated, but as we were only staying for one night before heading to Siem Reap, we decided to accept their discount and stay at the other hotel.

It was still walking distance to the riverside road, Sisowath Quay, so we decided to wander there in the afternoon.  We passed the Royal Palace, which looks extravagant from the outside. Due to the recent King’s death, the Palace is closed to visitors for three months.

There were many tourists around given it was peak visiting seasons. We were hungry and stopped at a local restaurant who claimed its proceeds were given to less fortunate Cambodian children. We ordered a delicious amok (Cambodian fish coconut curry) dish and La Lok (beef with rice).

After our meal we headed to the Phnom Penh Night Market for a stroll. It was a Saturday evening so there were many stalls selling all kinds of items from clothing, jewellery to souvenirs. We immediately went to the food stalls – a colourful display of Cambodian snacks – skewers of meat, fish, and all sorts of unidentifiable delicacies. Having just eaten we were very full but still decided to sample a few fresh rice rolls which were only one-thousand-five-hundred Riels (approximately twenty-five cents) each! In the centre of the food stalls were many bamboo mats which the locals used for eating their meals. We also tried a sweet dessert, similar to ais kacang (a Malaysian dessert), consistent of various sweet/savoury snacks and mixed with shaved ice, coconut milk and syrup.

One of the many food stalls at the night market
Rice paper rolls and other delicacies
Fresh sugar cane juice
Fresh seafood on skewers
Various processed meats on skewers
The very popular Angry bird featured on skewers
An assortment of Cambodian foods, rice paper rolls and papaya salad
Cambodia ais kacang dessert

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A wedding in Sri Lanka http://sonyaandtravis.com/a-wedding-in-sri-lanka/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=a-wedding-in-sri-lanka http://sonyaandtravis.com/a-wedding-in-sri-lanka/#comments Sat, 29 Dec 2012 02:57:04 +0000 http://sonyaandtravis.com/?p=2389 We went to a friend’s wedding in Sri Lanka on our way home from India. The wedding was held in the capital Colombo. Much of two days there was spent with other visiting friends (mainly eating glorious seafood), and then … Continue reading

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We went to a friend’s wedding in Sri Lanka on our way home from India. The wedding was held in the capital Colombo.

Much of two days there was spent with other visiting friends (mainly eating glorious seafood), and then there was the beautiful Buddhist wedding.

Whilst brief, it was a really enjoyable side trip and end to our adventures – we’d love to go there again someday!

Sonya wearing a sari for the Sri Lanka wedding
Travis and Sonya at the Sri Lanka wedding
Traditional dancers welcoming the groom and bride
Sonya with friends at restaurant Ministry of Crab
Table setting at Ministry of Crab restaurant

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Silk Road and trans-Himalayan – the end of an epic journey http://sonyaandtravis.com/silk-road-and-trans-himalayan/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=silk-road-and-trans-himalayan http://sonyaandtravis.com/silk-road-and-trans-himalayan/#comments Thu, 27 Dec 2012 15:06:12 +0000 http://sonyaandtravis.com/?p=2379 We have come the end of our three month long journey starting from Qatar,  completing two major ancient trade routes the Silk Road where we started at Iran (Persia) and ended up in Western China, and the trans-Himalayan trade route … Continue reading

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We have come the end of our three month long journey starting from Qatar,  completing two major ancient trade routes the Silk Road where we started at Iran (Persia) and ended up in Western China, and the trans-Himalayan trade route continuing in China and heading south to India.

We have learnt a lot about the Persian empire and experienced the great extent of it along the Silk Road, with influences all the way in India. The trans-Himalayan route elevated us to the highest we had been with glimpses of Mount Everest.

Click on the markers below to find links to blog posts with further details of the amazing journey.

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Jama Masjid (Friday Mosque), Delhi, India http://sonyaandtravis.com/jama-masjid-friday-mosque-delhi-india/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=jama-masjid-friday-mosque-delhi-india http://sonyaandtravis.com/jama-masjid-friday-mosque-delhi-india/#comments Thu, 27 Dec 2012 12:39:34 +0000 http://sonyaandtravis.com/?p=2362 It was ironic that the last mosque we would see, would be our most unfortunate encounter, not because of its architecture – the simple red sandstone facade with contrasting white onion-style domes was quite beautiful, but due to the disappointing etiquette … Continue reading

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It was ironic that the last mosque we would see, would be our most unfortunate encounter, not because of its architecture – the simple red sandstone facade with contrasting white onion-style domes was quite beautiful, but due to the disappointing etiquette in which we were treated.

Having visited a number of mosques throughout our travels in the middle east and more recently the Silk Road, we had learnt a lot about Islam and always ensured we respected and abided by the general rules and etiquette of a mosque when visiting.

It started when we were charged three-hundred rupees to enter the mosque, masked as a camera charge. This was a first as mosques we had visited had never asked for a financial contribution from visitors. They wouldn’t even let us in if we agreed to not take photographs.

After payment, Sonya was forced to wear a chodor (an open cloak), even though she was modestly dressed there, with long sleeved blouse, ankle length skirt and even a scarf to cover her hair. We were confused seeing so many women wearing short sleeved sleeves and uncovered hair when we stepped inside.

Inside wasn’t much better either, with children and women playing with the water of the ablution pond and people using their mobile phones near the qibla.

Travis on the main steps leading to Jama MasjidThe eastern gate of the mosque was the rural entranceNorthern entrance of the mosque viewed through the southern entrance
Minaret of the Jama Masjid, notice the call to prayer speakersThe bazaar leading up to the eastern entranceBazaars surrounding the Jama Masjid
The Jama Masjid (mosque) eastern entrance gateEastern entrance gate, the domes of the mosque can be seen in the backgroundEastern entrance gate of the Jama Masjid
The entrance to the Jama Masjid prayer roomCorner minaret of the Jama MasjidEastern entrances viewed from the inner courtyard of Jama Masjid
Jama Masjid with two onion shaped domesJama Masjid with minaret and dome on either sideView of Jama Masjid (Friday Mosque)
Close up of Jama Masjid onion shaped domesThe ablution pond inside Jama MasjidView of Jama Masjid (Friday Mosque)

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Delhi, India – Humayun’s Tomb and Red Fort http://sonyaandtravis.com/delhi-india-humayuns-tomb-and-red-fort/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=delhi-india-humayuns-tomb-and-red-fort http://sonyaandtravis.com/delhi-india-humayuns-tomb-and-red-fort/#comments Thu, 27 Dec 2012 12:33:19 +0000 http://sonyaandtravis.com/?p=2360 From Amritsar we caught a final train to our last Indian city Delhi. Whilst we spent a lot of the time buying clothes (four under one-hundred dollars a whole formal outfit including suit, shirt and shoes can be purchased) and … Continue reading

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From Amritsar we caught a final train to our last Indian city Delhi. Whilst we spent a lot of the time buying clothes (four under one-hundred dollars a whole formal outfit including suit, shirt and shoes can be purchased) and souvenirs, we did explore some of the main tourist attractions in Delhi.

Our hostel was in the touristy area of New Delhi, Paharganj; a very short walk from New Delhi train station. The location made it a very comfortable and enjoyable final few days, there was plenty to eat and buy only walking distance from the hostel.

As normal in any new city we visit, first exploration was by foot to nearby Chandni Chowk located in the Old Delhi area. We reached the Jama Masjid (Friday Mosque), the largest mosque in India. Having now visited a huge number of mosques, we were quite shocked at how poorly it followed Islamic etiquette, so shocked that I thought I would write about it in a separate post.

Around the mosque were huge bazaars selling Islamic clothing, food and general knick-knacks, plus the occasional chicken and goat.

Humayun’s Tomb

A beautiful red sandstone tomb designed by a Persian architect. The tomb was set in a standard Charbagh (literally meaning four gardens) style garden with water dividing the grounds into four separate quadrants, similar to the Taj Mahal.

The main gate leading to the entrance of Humayun's TombThe main gate of Humayun's TombHumayun's Tomb seen from the Western gate
Humayun's Tomb viewed from the Western gateHumayun's Tomb and the Charbagh style gardensStalactite minor arch of Humayun's Tomb
Row of exterior arches of Humayun's TombStairs leading up to the main tombOne of the main exterior arches of Humayun's Tomb
View of the west gate and Charbagh style gardens from Humayun's TombHumayun's TombCarved stone screen typical of Mughal architecture
One of the main exterior arches of Humayun's TombEastern main exterior arch of Humayun's TombView of the Eastern side of Humayun's Tomb
View to the north from Humayun's TombView of the western arch of Humayun's TombView of the north-western corner of Humayun's Tomb

Red Fort

Our final site in Delhi was the Red Fort (or also named Lal Qila), named from the red sandstone used during construction.  The Red Fort had a grand entrance gate and high walls; inside featured the usual traits of Mughal palace complexes.

Delhi Red Fort (Lal Qila) signRed Fort West Lahore GateDog-leg entrance through Lahore Gate
Domed arcade containing shops called the Chatta Chowk (covered bazaar)Diwan-i-Aam of the Red FortMarble Throne and Bungalow in Diwan-I-Am
The splendid Rang Mahal in the Red Fort complexMarble inlay flower found on the columns of the Diwan-i-KhasMarble inlay flower found inside the Diwan-i-Khas in the Red Fort
Diwan-i-Aam with marble inlay of flowersSteps leading to the door of the Moti Masjid (mosque) in the Red FortSouthern small marble pavilion known as Hira-mahal
Zafar Mahal at the Red FortRed Fort Complex mapNaqqar Khana a drum house at the Red Fort
Intricate carved flowers in the red sandstoneThe Naqqar Khana viewed from the westLahori Gate inside the red fort
Western fortification walls of the Red FortPre entry gate leading to Lahori GateThe western entrance of the Red Fort

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Wagah border ceremony, Indian-Pakistan border http://sonyaandtravis.com/wagah-border-ceremony-indian-pakistan-border/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=wagah-border-ceremony-indian-pakistan-border http://sonyaandtravis.com/wagah-border-ceremony-indian-pakistan-border/#comments Wed, 26 Dec 2012 05:59:31 +0000 http://sonyaandtravis.com/?p=2352 The following morning we visited the temple again, before  heading to Jallianwala Bagh, a memorial garden for the 1919 massacre. There were many families and tourists strolling through the gardens, visiting the museum explains the tragic occurrences of that day. … Continue reading

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The following morning we visited the temple again, before  heading to Jallianwala Bagh, a memorial garden for the 1919 massacre. There were many families and tourists strolling through the gardens, visiting the museum explains the tragic occurrences of that day.

We had lunch and then headed back to the hotel where we had arranged a trip to the Wagah border, the road that separates India and Pakistan.  Each day, a border closing ceremony is held at sunset where the Indian and Pakistani security forces perform an aggressive but comical military ‘routine’ whilst the gates are closed.  When we arrived on our bus, there were many people there already. Street vendors were selling drinks, food, Indian flags and all sorts of souvenirs. It was far more popular an event that I recall during my last visit. The gates were closed and it was sweltering. We lined up, packed amongst what seemed like zillions of Indians and tourists. A fair bit of pushing and shoving took place as everyone was anxious to get into the stands over looking the ceremony. Eventually, they opened the gates to let everyone in. Fortunately, there is a tourist entrance – we were security checked and allowed in. The tourist section was one of the better positions giving us great views of the ceremony.

The Wagah border ceremony started with children passing flags to one another, followed by an entertaining display of military might. The crowd support (in both size and noise) from the India side far exceeded the Pakistani side, which also seemed to be gender segregated (from what we could see).

It was an enjoyable event and by the time we reached our hotel it was nightfall.

The Indian welcome gate seen after crossing the Pakistan-India border
The Pakistan welcome gate seen after crossing the India-Pakistan border
The mens section of the grandstands waiting for the show
Patriotic Indian boy waving a large Indian flag
The India-Pakistan Wagah border
Two girls running with a large Indian flag
Elderly Indian women running with an Indian flag
Indian guard at the Indian-Pakistan border
Indian guards performing a show at the Indian-Pakistan border
About to open the Indian-Pakistan border
Two Indian guards waiting for the lowering of the flags
A display of carefully choreographed contempt by Pakistan and India
Lowering of the Pakistan and Indian flags
Indian guard wearing official uniform and headwear

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Golden Temple, Amritsar, Punjab, India http://sonyaandtravis.com/golden-temple-amritsar-punjab-india/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=golden-temple-amritsar-punjab-india http://sonyaandtravis.com/golden-temple-amritsar-punjab-india/#comments Wed, 26 Dec 2012 05:53:58 +0000 http://sonyaandtravis.com/?p=2345 After a long train ride from Udaipur to Delhi, and then another long bus from Delhi to Amritsar we arrived at the spiritual centre of the Sikh faith. We checked into a hotel near the city’s main attraction – the … Continue reading

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After a long train ride from Udaipur to Delhi, and then another long bus from Delhi to Amritsar we arrived at the spiritual centre of the Sikh faith.

We checked into a hotel near the city’s main attraction – the Golden Temple. By then, the sun was setting so we decided to take a walk to the temple.  It was a lot busier than I experienced during my last visit in 2006 – and we lined up alongside many Sikh families to put our shoes into storage, wash our feet before entering, and for Travis to collect a scarf for his head.

The grandeur and magnificence of the Golden Temple is breathtaking as one first enters the area. It is set on one side of a huge man-made lake of water. Whilst witnessing the temple’s dazzling gold exterior is amazing, seeing the many, many Sikhs make their pilgrimage to this sacred place quite a moving experience.  Many were walking around the temple, as we were, others sat quietly and respectfully on the edge of the holy lake. The place was so alight with colourful turbans, and sarees.

After circling the Golden Temple, we went into the Langar canteen. The generous Sikh community offer free food for anybody who enters the Langar – and anybody can have a meal as often as they wish. The meal is simple – everybody entering receives a traditional thali steel plate and a steel bowl for water. Upon entering the canteen, people sit in rows cross legged on the floor. The volunteers who serve the food pass through each row, placing dahl, water, bread on each person’s plate.

The Golden Temple a prominent Sikh Gurdwara
Akal Takht (The Throne of the Timeless One)
The Harmandir Sahib with clock tower in the background
The Darbar Sahib and North entrance gate
Golden Temple and clock tower
Travis and Sonya at the Golden Temple
Sikh pilgrim viewing the Golden Temple
The Golden Temple at twilight
The Golden Temple viewed through the North entrance gate
The Golden temple and Akal Takht
The Golden Temple or Harmandir Sahib
Central Sikh Museum and clock tower
Sikh man in traditional dress and turban at the Golden Temple
Two Sikh men wearing royal blue turbans common among Sikh ministers and gyanis
Sikh man wearing traditional Orange and Blue colours that reflect the Khalsa
Travis taking a photo of a Sikh at the Golden Temple
Sonya at the Golden Temple

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